Travyde Travel and Discovery Guide to Canada

Explore Travyde's curated travel and discovery guides to 532 destinations in Canada!

Canada
Marathon (Ontario)
Brandon (Manitoba)
Ramea
North Bay
Sudbury (Ontario)
Powell River
Port Dover
Huntsville (Ontario)
Fort St John
Mont Tremblant
Churchill Falls
Labrador City
Yellowknife
Georgetown (Ontario)
Longview (Alberta)
Nipigon
Hearst
Banff
Leamington (Ontario)
Lake Superior Provincial Park
Placentia (Newfoundland)
Lillooet
Fogo Island and Change Islands
Killarney (Ontario)
Blind River
French River
Calgary
Kapuskasing
Sault Sainte Marie (Ontario)
St. Johns
Thompson
Toronto
Bathurst (New Brunswick)
Moosonee
Oka
Ipperwash Beach
Wawa
Wemindji
Belcarra
Mississauga
Battersea (Ontario)
Limoges (Ontario)
Grand Manan Island
Rockwood Conservation Area
Terrace Bay
Twillingate
Kenora
Dawson Creek
Winnipeg
Tobermory (Ontario)
Baie Comeau
Mount Robson Provincial Park
Pangnirtung
Valleyview
Happy Adventure
Parry Sound
Moncton
Portage la Prairie
Castlegar
East Gwillimbury
Chester (Nova Scotia)
Auyuittuq National Park
Flin Flon
Slave Lake
Cole Harbour (Nova Scotia)
Huntingdon (Quebec)
Port Hope Simpson
Winkler
Yarmouth (Nova Scotia)
Carbonear
Falcon Lake
Kelowna
Owen Sound
Eastport (Canada)
Pisew Falls Provincial Park
Burlington (Ontario)
Dartmouth (Nova Scotia)
Dauphin
Montreal
Red Rock (Ontario)
Hamber Provincial Park
Perth Andover
Wasaga Beach
Bracebridge
High River
Prince Albert National Park
Arnprior
Black Rock (New Brunswick)
Minas Basin
Lake Louise
Steinbach
Magnetawan
North Vancouver
Fort Chipewyan
Manning Provincial Park
Miramichi
Elk Island National Park
Killaloe (Ontario)
Sainte Anne des Lacs
CanadaA land of vast distances and rich natural resources, Canada became a self-governing dominion in 1867 while retaining ties to the British crown. Initially populated by various First Nation tribes and then colonized by the French and British, Canada is today a cultural mosaic made up of people who have come from all around the world. Economically and technologically, the nation has developed in parallel with the US, its neighbour to the south across the world's longest unfortified border. Renowned for its vast, untouched landscape, its unique blend of cultures and multifaceted history, Canada is one of the world's major tourist destinations. Few countries can compare with the natural beauty, geographic diversity and wildlife of Canada. Bordered by the Atlantic, Pacific and Arctic Oceans, Canada’s ever-changing topography ranges from the dizzying heights of the Rocky Mountains to vast boreal forests, endless prairies, desert and rainforest regions. Added to the extraordinary natural beauty are the vibrant, cosmopolitan cities, like Toronto, Montreal and Vancouver, where most of the population lives. No wonder Canada is consistently ranked as one of the wealthiest, least corrupt and most liveable nations on earth. Still, Canada faces the political challenges of meeting public demands for quality improvements in health care, education, social services, and economic competitiveness, as well as responding to the particular concerns of predominantly francophone Quebec.1

Quick Facts

Population

34,834,841 (July 2014 est.)

Major Cities

Toronto 5.377 million; Montreal 3.75 million; Vancouver 2.197 million; OTTAWA (capital) 1.208 million; Calgary 1.16 million (2011)

Climate

varies from temperate in south to subarctic and arctic in north

Languages

English (official) 58.7%, French (official) 22%, Punjabi 1.4%, Italian 1.3%, Spanish 1.3%, German 1.3%, Cantonese 1.2%, Tagalog 1.2%, Arabic 1.1%, other 10.5%

Ethnic Groups

Canadian 32.2%, English 19.8%, French 15.5%, Scottish 14.4%, Irish 13.8%, German 9.8%, Italian 4.5%, Chinese 4.5%, North American Indian 4.2%, other 50.9% (2011 est.)

Religions

Catholic 40.5% (includes Roman Catholic 38.7%, Orthodox 1.6%, other Catholic .2%), Protestant 20.3% (includes United Church 6.1%, Anglican 5%, Baptist 1.9%, Lutheran 1.5%, Pentecostal 1.5%, Presbyterian 1.4%, other Protestant 2.9%), other Christian 6.3%, Muslim 3.2%, Hindu 1.5%, Sikh 1.4%, Buddhist 1.1%, Jewish 1%, other 0.6%, none 23.9% (2011 est.)

Terrain

mostly plains with mountains in west and lowlands in southeast

GDP per Capita

$43,100 (2013 est.)

National Symbol

maple leaf

Shared Borders

US 8,893 km (includes 2,477 km with Alaska)

Country Scorecards

Quality of Life

is a ranking of the generalized standard of living in a country.

Purchasing Power

is a ranking of how many goods can be purchased with the an unit of the country's currency.

Consumer Price Index

is a ranking of the prices of a generalized basket of common goods.

Safety

is a ranking of how safe the country is for both travellers and locals.

Pollution

is a ranking of the amount of pollution and its effect on humans and nature.

Healthcare

is a ranking of quality and availability of healthcare services.

Budgeting for Canada

Average Monthly Disposable Income After Tax2806.59USD

Food and Drink

Inexpensive Meal11.62USD
Midrange Meal for Two53.63USD
McDonalds Combo7.15USD
Domestic Beer, 0.5L4.47USD
Imported Beer, 0.33L5.36USD
Coke/Pepsi1.68USD
Midrange Wine13.41USD
0.33L Bottled Water1.51USD
Water, 1.5L1.8USD
Milk, 1L1.78USD
Bread, 500g2.46USD
Apples, 1kg3.09USD
Oranges, 1kg3.08USD
Rice, 1kg3.32USD
Cappucino3.29USD
Cigarettes, Pack9.83USD

Transportation

Public Transportation, 1 Ticket2.68USD
Public Transportation, Monthly80.44USD
Gas, 1L1.18USD
Taxi, Start3.26USD
Taxi, 1km1.64USD
Taxi, 1hr wait28.6USD

Misc Expenses

Prepaid Mobile, 1min0.29USD
Internet, 6mbps, per month44.77USD
Levis Jeans52.1USD
Summer Dress, Zara/HM37.9USD
Nike Shoes91.14USD
Leather Shoes, Men96.33USD

Highlights of Canada

Suggested itineraries for Canada

A Taste of Eastern Canada

1 favourite(s),Rating: 5/5

Recommended timeframe: 3 to 5 days

Visit canada’s most vibrant and diversified city Toronto, experience the mighty Niagara Falls, ride on fascinating Thousand Islands Lake. Step back in time on a visit to the rural Upper Canada Village, visit Old Fort Henry a 19th century British military fortress and tour the atmospheric Old Town of Quebec City, a UNESCO World Heritage Site. End this tour in the beautiful Montreal - the most European city outside Europe. Don’t miss to taste the famous Canadian ice wine.
Destination Introduction Days
Toronto

Toronto is the most populous city in Canada and the provincial capital of Ontario. It is located on the northwestern shore of Lake Ontario. Toronto, with a population of 2.6 million, is at the heart of the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) which contains 6.2 million people. The city is the anchor of the Golden Horseshoe region, which wraps around Lake Ontario from Toronto to Niagara Falls and totals over 8.5 million residents, approximately a quarter of Canada's entire population. Toronto is the fourth largest city and fifth largest urban agglomeration in North America.

Spawned out of post-glacial alluvial deposits and bluffs, the area was populated at different times by Iroquois and later Wyandot (Huron) peoples. The settlement by Europeans started with the French building a seldom occupied fort near today's Exhibition grounds in the mid-1700s, then grew out of a backwoods English trading post established as York in 1793 (reverting to the current name Toronto in 1834). Later in the 19th century, it grew to become the cultural and economic focus of Canada. Owing largely to the country's liberal immigration policies starting in the 1960s, and the region's strong economy, Toronto has, in recent decades, been transformed into one of the most culturally and ethnically diverse cities in the world. More than 80 ethnic communities are represented, and over half of the city's residents were born outside Canada.

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Kingston

Kingston is a small village at the southern end of Lake Wakatipu, south of Queenstown in New Zealand. Activities in the area include fishing, boating, kayaking, hiking and rock climbing.

The village is the base for the Kingston Flyer, a tourist-oriented vintage passenger train pulled by one of two steam powered locomotives, one of the last of its kind in New Zealand.

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Ottawa

Ottawa is the capital of Canada. The city is situated on the Ontario side of the Ottawa River, opposite Gatineau, Quebec. The metropolitan population of Ottawa is 1.1 million and it is currently the fourth largest city in Canada, and the second largest in Ontario after Toronto.

Unique as a North American capital, the city is bilingual. English is the first language of a majority of the population, but French is the first language of a significant number. Staff in most stores and restaurants speak both well and, in general, bilingualism is common.

Ottawa is home to many of the world's cultures as thousands of immigrants from around the world now call Ottawa home. The city is probably best known as the nation's capital but has become one of the fastest growing cities in North America owing to the booming high-tech business sector.

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Montreal

Montreal (French: Montréal) is the metropolis of the province of Quebec. Quebec City is the political capital but Montreal is the cultural and economic capital of Quebec and the main entry point to the province. The second largest city in Canada, it is a city rich in culture and history and a well-deserved reputation as one of the liveliest cities in North America. Montreal is the second-largest French-speaking (as a mother language) city in the world, behind Paris. The population of Montreal is about 1.9 million, with 4 million in the metro area.

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Quebec City

Quebec City (French: Québec) is the "national" capital of the Canadian province of Quebec. Located at a commanding position on cliffs overlooking the St. Lawrence Seaway, Quebec City's Old Town is an UNESCO World Heritage Site and the only city in North America (outside Mexico and the Caribbean) with its original city walls. Quebec is a city of about 700,000 residents.

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Wonders of the West

1 favourite(s),Rating: 5/5

Recommended timeframe: 2 to 4 days

Visiting the well-known western cities, you will travel huge distances, and therefore you will see a big part and most of the highlights of western Canada. Enjoy a taste of everything; check out Vancouver - Canada's third largest and one of world most livable cities, learn the native culture and history, stray off the beaten track along Lake Louise, ride an Ice Explorer onto the Athabasca Glacier and visit the bright floral Butchart Gardens in Victoria. Board a gondola in the UNESCO World Heritage Site of Banff National Park and view Mount Robson, the tallest peak in the Rockies' to complete your tour of the magnificent Western Canada.
Destination Introduction Days
Vancouver

It's not hard to argue that Vancouver occupies a pretty enviable spot in the world. Blessed with miles of coastline, lush vegetation and crowned by the North Shore Mountains, it's hard to be there and not stop at some point and be amazed by what you see.

But scratch beneath that setting and you find a cosmopolitan city of many faces. It's a bit of old and a lot of new, a stopping place for immigrants that have infused the city's neighbourhoods, festivals and food. On one hand, it's the third largest metropolitan area in Canada, the second biggest destination for visitors to the country and the economic center of British Columbia. A modern city of glass towers with a variety of festivals, cultures and attractions, it has also been host to world events like the 1986 World Exposition and the 2010 Winter Olympics. To others, it's Vansterdam, the laid-back socially progressive city with the laissez-faire attitude to marijuana. With its Asian heritage and relative proximity to China and Japan, some see it as the gateway to Asia. And with all that nature minutes from your door, Vancouver is a haven for outdoor enthusiasts. It's one of those rare places you could ski in the mountains, hit the beach and play a round of golf all in the same day.

All of this makes it easy to be a local. Walk the Seawall. Spend a day in one of the parks. Indulge in food and treats from around the world at a neighbourhood restaurant. Or just grab a spot at the beach or on a patio and watch it all go by -- Vancouver is, after all, one of the most beautiful spots in the world.

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Edmonton

Edmonton is the capital city of Alberta, Canada. Its metro area is home to 1.1 million people and is the northernmost city in North America of at least one million people. Edmonton is famous for its beautiful river valley park system, the North Saskatchewan River Valley, which offers over 100 kilometers of recreational trails, wildlife viewing, and city views. The river valley also contains many parks, including Fort Edmonton Park, Canada's largest historical park. If the great outdoors is not your target, the city also offers West Edmonton Mall, the largest shopping mall in North America. On top of that, Edmonton has a vibrant theater community, a busy cycle of annual festivals, national sports teams active year-round, and wonderful winter recreational opportunities.

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Calgary

Calgary, Alberta's largest city, is located near where the prairies end and the foothills begin. As such, it is the eastern gateway to the Rocky Mountains and an important center of trade and tourism for the western prairies. It is your most likely point of access for Banff and Jasper, and a worthwhile destination in its own right. Calgary is the heart of the largest metropolitan area between Toronto and Vancouver, with over 1,220,000 people as of 2009 (1.1 million within city limits), making it Canada's fourth largest metropolitan area.

The June 2013 flooding in Calgary made international headlines. As of March 2014, the only changes visitors are likely to notice are the closure of the Inglewood Bird Sanctuary (accessible only by daily guided tours throughout 2014, but the Nature Centre is fully open), interruption of canoeing/kayaking on the Harvie Passage section of the Bow River, and roughly 36 km of bike paths that are closed as a result of flood damage and detours.

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Banff

The town of Banff is located in Banff National Park, in the Canadian Rockies. It is the larger of the two populated areas in Banff National Park, and is located about an hour and half drive west of Calgary and four hours south of Jasper. The park is easily accessible for international travellers via Calgary International Airport, which has international scheduled and charter flights. Banff is part of the Canadian Rocky Mountain Parks UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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Maritimes Tour

1 favourite(s),Rating: 5/5

Recommended timeframe: 1 to 3 days

Discover the beauty of Canada's Atlantic Maritime Provinces at your own leisurely pace as you travel down scenic coast, explore Halifax and Saint John, enjoy the red and green landscape of Prince Edward Island, and savour the renowned scenic drive along Nova Scotia's south coast and wander out and in the North America oldest city St. John’s. Experience the fresh salt air, unspoiled nature, rich history and warm hospitality of one of the world's most popular destinations.
Destination Introduction Days
Lunenburg

Lunenburg is a small fishing town in Nova Scotia, Canada, first established in 1753. The Old Town of Lunenburg was inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List in 1995.

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Saint John

Saint John is the largest city in the Canadian province of New Brunswick, located in the south of the province on the Bay of Fundy.

Saint John is a city whose population is composed almost entirely of the descendants of Irish immigrants and British loyalists. Canada's oldest incorporated city, Saint John boasts a metro population of approximately 125,000 and routinely plays host to cruise ships and individual tourists from all over North America. (Note: Saint John is never spelled St. John - locals will be very quick to point this out).

Climate

Temperatures in Saint John vary by season. In the summertime temperatures are usually around 22 degrees celsius and in the wintertime they usually dip to around 3.9 degrees celsius. Rain is common in the spring and autumn, but it usually doesn't rain much in the summer. Fog is not uncommon during the summer months. There is the occasional heavy snowfall in the winter; however, snow is usually moderate.

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Charlottetown

Charlottetown is the capital city of Prince Edward Island, one of the Atlantic Provinces of Canada.

Charlottetown is a great place to spend a few days. It's a quaint and pretty town, small enough to be able to walk around, and has lots of good restaurants and bars. It's also within easy reach of the PEI National Park.

Climate






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The 30 Most Popular Cities in Canada

Sudbury (Ontario)

Sudbury (official name Greater Sudbury) is a city of approximately 160,000 people, located in Northern Ontario, Canada. It is Northern Ontario's largest city in both area and population, and a major retail and service centre for the region.

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Sudbury (Ontario) by John Weir 1 By: John Weir
Banff

The town of Banff is located in Banff National Park, in the Canadian Rockies. It is the larger of the two populated areas in Banff National Park, and is located about an hour and half drive west of Calgary and four hours south of Jasper. The park is easily accessible for international travellers via Calgary International Airport, which has international scheduled and charter flights. Banff is part of the Canadian Rocky Mountain Parks UNESCO World Heritage Site.

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Banff by  Foursquare 2 By: Foursquare
Calgary

Calgary, Alberta's largest city, is located near where the prairies end and the foothills begin. As such, it is the eastern gateway to the Rocky Mountains and an important center of trade and tourism for the western prairies. It is your most likely point of access for Banff and Jasper, and a worthwhile destination in its own right. Calgary is the heart of the largest metropolitan area between Toronto and Vancouver, with over 1,220,000 people as of 2009 (1.1 million within city limits), making it Canada's fourth largest metropolitan area.

The June 2013 flooding in Calgary made international headlines. As of March 2014, the only changes visitors are likely to notice are the closure of the Inglewood Bird Sanctuary (accessible only by daily guided tours throughout 2014, but the Nature Centre is fully open), interruption of canoeing/kayaking on the Harvie Passage section of the Bow River, and roughly 36 km of bike paths that are closed as a result of flood damage and detours.

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Calgary by Jacenty 3 By: Jacenty
Sault Sainte Marie (Ontario)

Sault Ste Marie is a city of approximately 78,000 people, in Northern Ontario. Directly across the St. Mary's River -- and the Canada/US border -- is its twin city, Sault Ste Marie, Michigan.

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Sault Sainte Marie (Ontario) by HAMANA 4 By: HAMANA
Toronto

Toronto is the most populous city in Canada and the provincial capital of Ontario. It is located on the northwestern shore of Lake Ontario. Toronto, with a population of 2.6 million, is at the heart of the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) which contains 6.2 million people. The city is the anchor of the Golden Horseshoe region, which wraps around Lake Ontario from Toronto to Niagara Falls and totals over 8.5 million residents, approximately a quarter of Canada's entire population. Toronto is the fourth largest city and fifth largest urban agglomeration in North America.

Spawned out of post-glacial alluvial deposits and bluffs, the area was populated at different times by Iroquois and later Wyandot (Huron) peoples. The settlement by Europeans started with the French building a seldom occupied fort near today's Exhibition grounds in the mid-1700s, then grew out of a backwoods English trading post established as York in 1793 (reverting to the current name Toronto in 1834). Later in the 19th century, it grew to become the cultural and economic focus of Canada. Owing largely to the country's liberal immigration policies starting in the 1960s, and the region's strong economy, Toronto has, in recent decades, been transformed into one of the most culturally and ethnically diverse cities in the world. More than 80 ethnic communities are represented, and over half of the city's residents were born outside Canada.

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Toronto by  Foursquare 5 By: Foursquare
Winnipeg

Winnipeg is the capital and largest city in Manitoba, and a major centre on the Canadian Prairies. About 660,000 people live in the city proper, with about 730,000 in the entire metropolitan area. "The Peg" is a city as diverse in and of itself as the whole of Canada.

It is a well rounded city with a stable economy. It is a destination for architecture, rivers, history, money (mint) arts, and museums. It has something for everyone-from boutiques to cheap value stores, Winnipeg has a great retail market, where a lot of new concepts are tried.

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Winnipeg by htabor 6 By: htabor
Montreal

Montreal (French: Montréal) is the metropolis of the province of Quebec. Quebec City is the political capital but Montreal is the cultural and economic capital of Quebec and the main entry point to the province. The second largest city in Canada, it is a city rich in culture and history and a well-deserved reputation as one of the liveliest cities in North America. Montreal is the second-largest French-speaking (as a mother language) city in the world, behind Paris. The population of Montreal is about 1.9 million, with 4 million in the metro area.

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Montreal by MonPiche 7 By: MonPiche
North Vancouver

North Vancouver is a mostly suburban area situated across the Burrard Inlet from downtown Vancouver. Surrounded by mountains and water on three sides, it's the ideal playground for the outdoor-minded. You can wander on miles of hiking trails (or test yourself on Nature's stairmaster), take in steep decents on a mountain bike or skis, kayak a fjord and cross canyons on a suspension bridge. If you're not looking for something that gets the heart going, there are always the stellar views the city affords. Ride the gondola to the top of Grouse Mountain for a view of Vancouver and beyond, stroll along the waterfront by Lonsdale Quay or relax in one of the many coffee shops. And that's one of the great things about North Vancouver — it's close to the sophistication offered by Vancouver but in 30 minutes you can be in the wilderness or a beautiful spot like Deep Cove and forget you're in a metropolitan area of over two million people.

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North Vancouver by randirann 8 By: randirann
Halifax (Nova Scotia)

Halifax is the capital city of Nova Scotia and the largest city in the Atlantic Provinces of Canada. The city's origins and rich maritime history derive from a strategic location and one of the world's great natural harbours. In the 19th and early 20th century, Halifax was the entry point for European immigration to Canada. Today, Halifax is a busy Atlantic seaport and the economic and cultural hub of Eastern Canada.

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Halifax (Nova Scotia) by MAL10587 9 By: MAL10587
Timmins

Timmins is a city in Northern Ontario with a population of nearly 43,000 (2006 census). The City stretches over approximately 2,961.52 km2 (1,840.20 sq mi) of land, making Timmins one of the largest cities in Canada land wise. Timmins was founded January 1, 1912 and is named after Noah Timmins, founder of the Hollinger Gold Mine. The gold rush of 1909 earned Timmins the nickname of the “City with the Heart of Gold”. The city is located in one of the richest mineral producing areas in the Western Hemisphere. It is a leader in the production of gold and base metals. Main attractions are mining tours, outdoor recreation and the Shania Twain Centre.

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Timmins by Eric Marshall 10 By: Eric Marshall
Windsor (Ontario)

Windsor is a mid-sized Canadian city on the southwest tip of Ontario. It's an extremely multi-cultural city with over 20% of its population having been born outside of Canada. The city's rich cultural background is made aware by the Middle Eastern, Italian, and Asian neighbourhoods in Windsor. It is located across the Detroit River from the city of Detroit.

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Windsor (Ontario) by Irene Kravchuk 11 By: Irene Kravchuk
Victoria (British Columbia)

Victoria is the capital of the province of British Columbia, Canada located near the southern tip of Vancouver Island.

It's a medium sized city with approximately 350,000 in Greater Victoria, including the Saanich Peninsula. Nicknamed the Garden City for the Butchart Gardens and the abundant green space within the city, it also lies within the world's most northern Mediterranean climate at a latitude of 48.5° North.

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Victoria (British Columbia) by panoramio 12 By: panoramio
Lethbridge

Lethbridge is located in southern Alberta, Canada. The city is a commercial hub for the many smaller farming and ranching communities in the surrounding area. It is quiet and on the small side, but has a friendly population. Lethbridge has approximately 83 000 people, and that number is growing fast. The natural beauty of the area is in its starkness. The coulees are a valley formed by erosion. The Old Man River runs through this interesting landscape. This valley provides some shelter from the wind, which can be quite strong at almost any time of the year.

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Lethbridge by Gordon Niamath 13 By: Gordon Niamath
London (Ontario)

London is a medium-sized city in Ontario, Canada. It is located west of Toronto, between Lake Huron and Lake Erie at the fork of the Thames River (not to be confused with the River Thames in London, England).

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London (Ontario) by FTCBrandt 14 By: FTCBrandt
Kitchener

Kitchener, with neighbouring Waterloo and Cambridge forms a tightly-integrated metro area within the larger Region of Waterloo in Southwestern Ontario.

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Kitchener by Piadera 15 By: Piadera
Niagara Falls (Ontario)

Niagara Falls, Ontario, is the self-proclaimed "Honeymoon Capital of the World". For over a century the grandeur of the waterfalls of the Niagara River have attracted tourists to this destination.

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Niagara Falls (Ontario) by Barbara Marciniak 16 By: Barbara Marciniak
Regina

Regina is the capital city of the province of Saskatchewan. It is in the south part of the province on highway No. 1. Regina is home of the RCMP Training Academy and the CFL Saskatchewan Roughriders.

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Regina by Kirk Cumming 17 By: Kirk Cumming
Banff National Park

Banff National Park is in the Alberta Rockies region of Alberta, Canada.

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Banff National Park by photography-col 18 By: photography-col
Vancouver

It's not hard to argue that Vancouver occupies a pretty enviable spot in the world. Blessed with miles of coastline, lush vegetation and crowned by the North Shore Mountains, it's hard to be there and not stop at some point and be amazed by what you see.

But scratch beneath that setting and you find a cosmopolitan city of many faces. It's a bit of old and a lot of new, a stopping place for immigrants that have infused the city's neighbourhoods, festivals and food. On one hand, it's the third largest metropolitan area in Canada, the second biggest destination for visitors to the country and the economic center of British Columbia. A modern city of glass towers with a variety of festivals, cultures and attractions, it has also been host to world events like the 1986 World Exposition and the 2010 Winter Olympics. To others, it's Vansterdam, the laid-back socially progressive city with the laissez-faire attitude to marijuana. With its Asian heritage and relative proximity to China and Japan, some see it as the gateway to Asia. And with all that nature minutes from your door, Vancouver is a haven for outdoor enthusiasts. It's one of those rare places you could ski in the mountains, hit the beach and play a round of golf all in the same day.

All of this makes it easy to be a local. Walk the Seawall. Spend a day in one of the parks. Indulge in food and treats from around the world at a neighbourhood restaurant. Or just grab a spot at the beach or on a patio and watch it all go by -- Vancouver is, after all, one of the most beautiful spots in the world.

1
Vancouver by Nawitka 19 By: Nawitka
Quebec City

Quebec City (French: Québec) is the "national" capital of the Canadian province of Quebec. Located at a commanding position on cliffs overlooking the St. Lawrence Seaway, Quebec City's Old Town is an UNESCO World Heritage Site and the only city in North America (outside Mexico and the Caribbean) with its original city walls. Quebec is a city of about 700,000 residents.

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Quebec City by MonPiche 20 By: MonPiche
Saskatoon

Saskatoon is a city in central Saskatchewan. With a metropolitan population of about 257,000 people, it is the province's largest city. It's a little oasis among wheat fields.

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Saskatoon by panoramio 21 By: panoramio
Saint John

Saint John is the largest city in the Canadian province of New Brunswick, located in the south of the province on the Bay of Fundy.

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Saint John by DanVictory 22 By: DanVictory
Kingston (Ontario)

Kingston is a small city in the Canadian province of Ontario. It is on the north shore of Lake Ontario and the St Lawrence, almost exactly halfway between Montréal and Toronto.

As the first (very short lived) capital of Canada, Kingston was originally settled in 1673 as Cataraqui, a French colonial outpost which became Fort Frontenac. Today, Kingston is one of the most historic cities in Canada with numerous churches, old buildings, picturesque neighbourhoods, and 19th century fortifications. The city provides venues for nightlife such as clubbing and pubbing, and provides weekend escapes for people living in the neighbouring cities of Ottawa, Montreal and Toronto. There are ample historic sites and museums to visit, as well as many lively summer events.

Kingston is the home of two universities (Queen's University and Royal Military College) and one community college (St. Lawrence College). Along with tourism, these educational institutes and the students they attract provide much to the city's local economy. Kingston is also the home to a number of prisons.

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Kingston (Ontario) by americatramp 23 By: americatramp
Ottawa

Ottawa is the capital of Canada. The city is situated on the Ontario side of the Ottawa River, opposite Gatineau, Quebec. The metropolitan population of Ottawa is 1.1 million and it is currently the fourth largest city in Canada, and the second largest in Ontario after Toronto.

Unique as a North American capital, the city is bilingual. English is the first language of a majority of the population, but French is the first language of a significant number. Staff in most stores and restaurants speak both well and, in general, bilingualism is common.

Ottawa is home to many of the world's cultures as thousands of immigrants from around the world now call Ottawa home. The city is probably best known as the nation's capital but has become one of the fastest growing cities in North America owing to the booming high-tech business sector.

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Ottawa by MonPiche 24 By: MonPiche
Hamilton (Ontario)

Hamilton is a port city in Ontario with a population around 505,000. It is situated at the westernmost end of Lake Ontario—the city wraps around the lake and continues towards the Niagara Escarpment, referred to by locals as "the mountain."

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Hamilton (Ontario) by John Gillett 25 By: John Gillett
North Shore (British Columbia)

The North Shore of the Burrard Inlet is a mostly suburban area of Vancouver where dense urban meets dramatic tall mountains. The mountains provide attractions like the Grouse Mountain ski resort. At the west of the North Shore is Horseshoe Bay, ferry terminal to the Sunshine Coast.

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North Shore (British Columbia) by Cal Kimola Brown 26 By: Cal Kimola Brown
Penticton

Penticton (The 'Peach City') is a beautiful spot in the south Okanagan nestled between two lakes: The 155km long Okanagan Lake to the north, and the smaller Skaha Lake to the south. Tourism in Penticton is largely seasonal. In the summer tourists double Penticton's population to 60,000. Historically, in the winter things were very quiet, but now that World Cup Freestyle Skiing stops at local Apex Mountain every winter, the winter scene is picking up.

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Penticton by jackborno 27 By: jackborno
Churchill

Churchill is a community North of 53 in Manitoba, best known as the Polar Bear Capital of the World, and only slightly less known as the Beluga Capital of the World. For a multi-purpose capital, though, it's rather small, with a permanent population of only 813 people, who live their days on the shore of Hudson Bay, the bank of the Churchill River, and just past the treeline of the boreal forest.

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Churchill by Timothy K. 28 By: Timothy K.
Osoyoos

Osoyoos (IPA: /ɒˈsɔɪjuːs/) (Pronounced “O-sue-use”) , a town in the southern Okanagan valley of British Columbia, Canada. The Osoyoos region's semi-arid climate produces very hot, dry days, and may have Canada's hottest weather a few times each year. The chief industries of Osoyoos are fruit production, viticulture (wine making), and tourism. The town has over 5200 permanent residents as of June 2010.

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Osoyoos by istvan.hutton 29 By: istvan.hutton
Edmonton

Edmonton is the capital city of Alberta, Canada. Its metro area is home to 1.1 million people and is the northernmost city in North America of at least one million people. Edmonton is famous for its beautiful river valley park system, the North Saskatchewan River Valley, which offers over 100 kilometers of recreational trails, wildlife viewing, and city views. The river valley also contains many parks, including Fort Edmonton Park, Canada's largest historical park. If the great outdoors is not your target, the city also offers West Edmonton Mall, the largest shopping mall in North America. On top of that, Edmonton has a vibrant theater community, a busy cycle of annual festivals, national sports teams active year-round, and wonderful winter recreational opportunities.

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Edmonton by Kent Martens 30 By: Kent Martens