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Panmunjeom
판문점

Panmunjeom (판문점), also P'anmunjŏm, is on the demarcation line between North and South Korea.

A unique living relic of the Cold War era, Panmunjeom is a small village that happened to lie at the final battle front of the Korean War. The truce that ended hostilities was signed here in 1953, but as peace was never agreed to, the two sides are still officially at war over sixty years later and a million men stand guard around the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ). There are no troops in the DMZ itself (except in the JSA), although both sides of the 4 kilometer strip of land separating the Koreas are likely to be the most heavily armed in the world. Pillboxes, land mines, barbed wire, and tank stoppers line the entire border and stretch back halfway to Seoul in the South and Pyongyang in the North. This section is often referred to as the Militarized Zone. In South Korea there are also adjacent border areas called Civilian Control Zones where public access is restricted.

One kilometer east of the former village (now deserted) is the Joint Security Area (JSA), an almost circular patch of land with an 800-meter diameter. The area is jointly policed by the South and North, and the two sides occasionally meet for discussions. Most of the time the soldiers glare at each other across the border and have not been allowed to cross the demarcation line into each other's side since the Axe Murder Incident in 1976 (see below). Panmunjeom is on the Military Demarcation Line, which is the actual border between North and South Korea. The DMZ is a buffer along the north and south sides of the MDL (2 km into North Korea and 2 km into South Korea).

Panmunjeom (판문점), also P'anmunjŏm, is on the demarcation line between North and South Korea.

A unique living relic of the Cold War era, Panmunjeom is a small village that happened to lie at the final battle front of the Korean War. The truce that ended hostilities was signed here in 1953, but as peace was never agreed to, the two sides are still officially at war over sixty years later and a million men stand guard around the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ). There are no troops in the DMZ itself (except in the JSA), although both sides of the 4 kilometer strip of land separating the Koreas are likely to be the most heavily armed in the world. Pillboxes, land mines, barbed wire, and tank stoppers line the entire border and stretch back halfway to Seoul in the South and Pyongyang in the North. This section is often referred to as the Militarized Zone. In South Korea there are also adjacent border areas called Civilian Control Zones where public access is restricted.

One kilometer east of the former village (now deserted) is the Joint Security Area (JSA), an almost circular patch of land with an 800-meter diameter. The area is jointly policed by the South and North, and the two sides occasionally meet for discussions. Most of the time the soldiers glare at each other across the border and have not been allowed to cross the demarcation line into each other's side since the Axe Murder Incident in 1976 (see below). Panmunjeom is on the Military Demarcation Line, which is the actual border between North and South Korea. The DMZ is a buffer along the north and south sides of the MDL (2 km into North Korea and 2 km into South Korea).

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Authors: Robert K S

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Get around

Regardless of whether you visit from the North or South, your tour will be tightly controlled and you will have no opportunity to explore by yourself. You will be transported by bus into Panmunjeom and then escorted by soldiers from the respective side. You are allowed to move freely around the tight confines of the conference hut that crosses the demarcation line, and you may cross that line into North or South Korea. The door to the other side will be guarded whilst you remain inside the building.

Get around

Regardless of whether you visit from the North or South, your tour will be tightly controlled and you will have no opportunity to explore by yourself. You will be transported by bus into Panmunjeom and then escorted by soldiers from the respective side. You are allowed to move freely around the tight confines of the conference hut that crosses the demarcation line, and you may cross that line into North or South Korea. The door to the other side will be guarded whilst you remain inside the building.

Buy

North

All tourist facilities for foreigners in the DPRK include a gift shop, and the gateway to the DMZ is no exception. Just inside the concrete wall you can purchase Korean art and amongst other things, of course, endless amounts of literature on the Great Leader Kim Il Sung and his son Kim Jong Il. Prices are reasonable.

South

"The Monastery" in Camp Bonifas — actually a former officers' club, whose members used to wear brown robes for ceremonies and call themselves the "Merry Mad Monks of the DMZ" — has a gift shop retailing DMZ-related paraphernalia, including chunks of rusty barbed wire from the original demarcation line (W25,000) as well as blueberry wine from North Korea (brought in via a long detour through China).

Buy

North

All tourist facilities for foreigners in the DPRK include a gift shop, and the gateway to the DMZ is no exception. Just inside the concrete wall you can purchase Korean art and amongst other things, of course, endless amounts of literature on the Great Leader Kim Il Sung and his son Kim Jong Il. Prices are reasonable.

South

"The Monastery" in Camp Bonifas — actually a former officers' club, whose members used to wear brown robes for ceremonies and call themselves the "Merry Mad Monks of the DMZ" — has a gift shop retailing DMZ-related paraphernalia, including chunks of rusty barbed wire from the original demarcation line (W25,000) as well as blueberry wine from North Korea (brought in via a long detour through China).

Drink

Consumption of alcohol in the DMZ is prohibited and only allowed on special occasions.

Drink

Consumption of alcohol in the DMZ is prohibited and only allowed on special occasions.

Understand

A unique living relic of the Cold War era, Panmunjeom is a small village that happened to lie at the final battle front of the Korean War. The truce that ended hostilities was signed here in 1953, but as peace was never agreed to, the two sides are still officially at war over sixty years later and a million men stand guard around the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ). There are no troops in the DMZ itself (except in the JSA), although both sides of the 4 kilometer strip of land separating the Koreas are likely to be the most heavily armed in the world. Pillboxes, land mines, barbed wire, and tank stoppers line the entire border and stretch back halfway to Seoul in the South and Pyongyang in the North. This section is often referred to as the Militarized Zone. In South Korea there are also adjacent border areas called Civilian Control Zones where public access is restricted.

One kilometer east of the former village (now deserted) is the Joint Security Area (JSA), an almost circular patch of land with an 800-meter diameter. The area is jointly policed by the South and North, and the two sides occasionally meet for discussions. Most of the time the soldiers glare at each other across the border and have not been allowed to cross the demarcation line into each other's side since the Axe Murder Incident in 1976 (see below). Panmunjeom is on the Military Demarcation Line, which is the actual border between North and South Korea. The DMZ is a buffer along the north and south sides of the MDL (2 km into North Korea and 2 km into South Korea).

Understand

A unique living relic of the Cold War era, Panmunjeom is a small village that happened to lie at the final battle front of the Korean War. The truce that ended hostilities was signed here in 1953, but as peace was never agreed to, the two sides are still officially at war over sixty years later and a million men stand guard around the Demilitarized Zone (DMZ). There are no troops in the DMZ itself (except in the JSA), although both sides of the 4 kilometer strip of land separating the Koreas are likely to be the most heavily armed in the world. Pillboxes, land mines, barbed wire, and tank stoppers line the entire border and stretch back halfway to Seoul in the South and Pyongyang in the North. This section is often referred to as the Militarized Zone. In South Korea there are also adjacent border areas called Civilian Control Zones where public access is restricted.

One kilometer east of the former village (now deserted) is the Joint Security Area (JSA), an almost circular patch of land with an 800-meter diameter. The area is jointly policed by the South and North, and the two sides occasionally meet for discussions. Most of the time the soldiers glare at each other across the border and have not been allowed to cross the demarcation line into each other's side since the Axe Murder Incident in 1976 (see below). Panmunjeom is on the Military Demarcation Line, which is the actual border between North and South Korea. The DMZ is a buffer along the north and south sides of the MDL (2 km into North Korea and 2 km into South Korea).

Eat

The canteen in Camp Bonifas is no longer open to the civilian visitors, so most tours now head to eat elsewhere. There is no food available for purchase on the Northern side and the closest available facilities are in Kaesong.

Eat

The canteen in Camp Bonifas is no longer open to the civilian visitors, so most tours now head to eat elsewhere. There is no food available for purchase on the Northern side and the closest available facilities are in Kaesong.

Get in

Access to the DMZ is occasionally curtailed at short notice when tensions rise, for example in May 2010 during the aftermath of the Cheonan sinking. As of July 2010 tours are operating normally again, although considering high tensions in 2013 it is worth checking with your tour company prior to your visit.

From the South

Visits to Panmunjeom from the South Korean side must be arranged in advance as part of an organized tour, although for foreigners three days' notice usually suffices (longer over weekends). Many companies advertise "daily" tours, but generally tours to the DMZ run only certain days, so check in advance. On tour days, depending on the day, various combinations of tours to 3rd tunnel, tours to Panmunjeom, and joint tours are available. In terms of planning, please note that your booked tour can be cancelled at any time in response to the prevailing security situation.

There are restrictions on the nationality of people who can visit due to the sensitivity of the area. These restrictions are set by the United Nations and United States.

  • USO, tel. +82-2-795-3028, . The US military servicemen's organization offers tours that cover both the JSA and the Third Tunnel. Averaging twice a week, payment must be made no less than four days in advance and places fill up fast. US$77 for civilians, lunch not included (bring your own or W10,000 for chow at the canteen). The tours depart from USO's downtown Seoul complex near subway Samgakji stn at 7am and last until approx. 3.30pm. Tours never run on U.S. holidays and are announced on the month they occur.
  • Panmunjom Tour, tel. +82-2-7715593, . A specialist company offering various tours of the JSA (from W77,000) and the DMZ (W60,000; W120,000 with JSA tour). Tours start early in the morning, include lunch and get you back in Seoul by the afternoon.
  • International Cultural Service Club telephone: +82-2-755-0073.
  • Tour DMZ. Offers guided tours of the JSA, DMZ, or both. Tours depart from the So-Gong-Dong LOTTE Hotel near Eulgiro 1(il)-ga Station. Check-in is on the sixth floor; buses depart from the travel lounge on floor 2. Paying with cash or card on the morning of the tour is allowed. Lunch is included in the price. (JSA Tour: W77,000.)

Some Seoul-based companies such as Cosmojin Travel and Grace Travel require only a minimum of 24 hours' notice, but their prices are much higher. Be aware that their itineraries vary, and may not include entry into the DMZ.

The 62 kilometer journey towards Panmunjeom is a sight in itself. The 12-lane Freedom Road becomes eerily empty as you approach the border, as its primary purpose is to get tanks there as fast as possible if war breaks out. To repel an invasion, both sides of the highway, especially the side facing the Imjin River and open water to North Korea, are covered with barbed wire and dotted with observation posts every few hundred meters. Nearby hills house machine gun emplacements, the median strip has clusters of sandbags for defense, and some bridges above the highway have huge concrete blocks that can be dynamited to block the road. Large illuminated signs, proclaiming Freedom and Democracy in hangeul, face the North.

VIP Tour

If you happen to be (or have been) an ambassador or higher level government official, then a VIP Tour of Panmunjeom is available from South Korea.

If however you don't qualify and you are sufficiently important (politician, business leader, pop-star etc) then an alternative VIP tour is available.

Both tours have no restrictions on nationality, however UN approval is required beforehand.

From the North

To visit from the DPRK side is relatively straightforward if it is previously specified as part of your tour (most tours include a day trip to the DMZ from Pyongyang). See North Korea for tour agent listings.

The JSA is 215 kilometers south of Pyongyang. The two are connected by the six-lane Reunification Highway, which much like its Southern counterpart is vast, but ultimately poorly maintained and largely empty. Signs along the road count down the distance to Seoul.

Get in

Access to the DMZ is occasionally curtailed at short notice when tensions rise, for example in May 2010 during the aftermath of the Cheonan sinking. As of July 2010 tours are operating normally again, although considering high tensions in 2013 it is worth checking with your tour company prior to your visit.

From the South

Visits to Panmunjeom from the South Korean side must be arranged in advance as part of an organized tour, although for foreigners three days' notice usually suffices (longer over weekends). Many companies advertise "daily" tours, but generally tours to the DMZ run only certain days, so check in advance. On tour days, depending on the day, various combinations of tours to 3rd tunnel, tours to Panmunjeom, and joint tours are available. In terms of planning, please note that your booked tour can be cancelled at any time in response to the prevailing security situation.

There are restrictions on the nationality of people who can visit due to the sensitivity of the area. These restrictions are set by the United Nations and United States.

  • USO, tel. +82-2-795-3028, . The US military servicemen's organization offers tours that cover both the JSA and the Third Tunnel. Averaging twice a week, payment must be made no less than four days in advance and places fill up fast. US$77 for civilians, lunch not included (bring your own or W10,000 for chow at the canteen). The tours depart from USO's downtown Seoul complex near subway Samgakji stn at 7am and last until approx. 3.30pm. Tours never run on U.S. holidays and are announced on the month they occur.
  • Panmunjom Tour, tel. +82-2-7715593, . A specialist company offering various tours of the JSA (from W77,000) and the DMZ (W60,000; W120,000 with JSA tour). Tours start early in the morning, include lunch and get you back in Seoul by the afternoon.
  • International Cultural Service Club telephone: +82-2-755-0073.
  • Tour DMZ. Offers guided tours of the JSA, DMZ, or both. Tours depart from the So-Gong-Dong LOTTE Hotel near Eulgiro 1(il)-ga Station. Check-in is on the sixth floor; buses depart from the travel lounge on floor 2. Paying with cash or card on the morning of the tour is allowed. Lunch is included in the price. (JSA Tour: W77,000.)

Some Seoul-based companies such as Cosmojin Travel and Grace Travel require only a minimum of 24 hours' notice, but their prices are much higher. Be aware that their itineraries vary, and may not include entry into the DMZ.

The 62 kilometer journey towards Panmunjeom is a sight in itself. The 12-lane Freedom Road becomes eerily empty as you approach the border, as its primary purpose is to get tanks there as fast as possible if war breaks out. To repel an invasion, both sides of the highway, especially the side facing the Imjin River and open water to North Korea, are covered with barbed wire and dotted with observation posts every few hundred meters. Nearby hills house machine gun emplacements, the median strip has clusters of sandbags for defense, and some bridges above the highway have huge concrete blocks that can be dynamited to block the road. Large illuminated signs, proclaiming Freedom and Democracy in hangeul, face the North.

VIP Tour

If you happen to be (or have been) an ambassador or higher level government official, then a VIP Tour of Panmunjeom is available from South Korea.

If however you don't qualify and you are sufficiently important (politician, business leader, pop-star etc) then an alternative VIP tour is available.

Both tours have no restrictions on nationality, however UN approval is required beforehand.

From the North

To visit from the DPRK side is relatively straightforward if it is previously specified as part of your tour (most tours include a day trip to the DMZ from Pyongyang). See North Korea for tour agent listings.

The JSA is 215 kilometers south of Pyongyang. The two are connected by the six-lane Reunification Highway, which much like its Southern counterpart is vast, but ultimately poorly maintained and largely empty. Signs along the road count down the distance to Seoul.

Stay safe

From the South, entry into the JSA/DMZ requires that you read and sign a disclaimer from the United Nations where you agree to accept responsibility for "injury or death as a direct result of enemy action". Although it remains in a state of suspended animation you are technically in a real war zone.

Fun Fact: You get to keep your signed safety disclaimer after you have left Panmunjeom! (assuming that you survived of course).

Tour companies can and do suspend tours at short notice if the situation escalates, and it's unlikely you'll be allowed into the DMZ if there's any real risk.

Stay safe

From the South, entry into the JSA/DMZ requires that you read and sign a disclaimer from the United Nations where you agree to accept responsibility for "injury or death as a direct result of enemy action". Although it remains in a state of suspended animation you are technically in a real war zone.

Fun Fact: You get to keep your signed safety disclaimer after you have left Panmunjeom! (assuming that you survived of course).

Tour companies can and do suspend tours at short notice if the situation escalates, and it's unlikely you'll be allowed into the DMZ if there's any real risk.

See

When booking your tour, be sure to clarify what exactly will be offered. The primary points of interest for most visitors from the south are the Joint Security Area and the Third Tunnel, but not all tour companies have clearance to visit these and you'll have to pay a small premium for those that do.

From the North you will be able to visit the original site of the Panmunjeom village and the Peace Museum that was originally built for and houses original copies of the 1953 armistice. From there it is a short drive to the JSA.

DMZ and JSA

  • Camp Bonifas, at the southern entrance to DMZ. This is the US/South Korean military base standing "In Front of Them All" should an attack come. Visitors to Panmunjeom will change buses and get briefed here before entering the DMZ.
  • Freedom House, JSA. South Korea's pompous propaganda palace facing the demarcation line. Visitors are usually taken to the Peace Pagoda next to it, which provides good views of the JSA and surrounding countryside. Accessible only from the Southern side.
  • Panmun-guk, JSA. North Korea's pompous propaganda palace facing the demarcation line. Accessible only from the Northern side.
  • T1 through T3, JSA. These are the conference rooms straddling the border: the neat lines of microphones and, outside, the low concrete bar mark the exact position of the line of demarcation. Both South and North Korean soldiers in intentionally intimidating poses stand guard in and around the rooms. You're free to walk around the conference room and can hop from South to North if you wish. Just don't try to leave by the other exit!
  • Bridge of No Return, JSA. After the Korean war, some prisoners of war were given the choice to cross over the bridge or to stay on the side of their captors, hence the name. On August 18, 1976, a US attempt to cut down a poplar tree obstructing visibility of the bridge led to a battle with North Korean forces that left Capt. Arthur Bonifas and Lt. Mark Barrett dead in what was later known as the Axe Murder Incident. The bridge is now closed and a new bridge to the north is used instead. Usually visited from the South only.
  • North Korea Peace Museum, 500m north of the JSA. The building where the armistice agreement was signed. The actual documents are kept here, guarded over by a tattered, faded UN flag and a miraculously well-preserved DPRK flag. The axe of Axe Murder Incident fame is also stored here. Accessible from the North only.
  • Taesong-dong, DMZ. South Korea's showpiece "Freedom Village" in the DMZ, containing a little over 200 farmers working under 24-hour military guard and a 100-meter flagpole. The only ways to become a member of the village is to be born into it or by marriage (women only). Entry into the village is not permitted, but you will pass by on your way to the JSA from the South side.
  • Kijong-dong, DMZ. On the North Korean side, this is a former village built up with fancy apartment blocks and a 160-meter flagpole entered in the Guinness Book of World Records as the world's tallest — but nobody lives there, hence its common name "Propaganda Village". Entry into the village is not permitted, but it is clearly visible from the JSA (although binoculars will come in handy).

Outside the DMZ

On the South Korean side, sites outside the DMZ can be visited more cheaply and with less hassle. An hourly train runs between Seoul and Imjingak for about ₩ 1300 each way. Bus tours passing the Second & Third Tunnel cost ₩ 8000. This is an excellent alternative for the DMZ tours, though it is not possible to visit Panmunjeom this way.

  • Imjingak, Paju. A four-story museum and observatory 7 km south of the DMZ, with views across the Kaesong River towards the DMZ and North Korea. The train line to Pyongyang passes nearby. This is the closest you can get to the DMZ without security clearance. The museum is open 9 AM to 6 PM daily.
  • Second & Third Tunnel. Two of four tunnels secretly dug by the North Koreans that have been discovered so far.

See

When booking your tour, be sure to clarify what exactly will be offered. The primary points of interest for most visitors from the south are the Joint Security Area and the Third Tunnel, but not all tour companies have clearance to visit these and you'll have to pay a small premium for those that do.

From the North you will be able to visit the original site of the Panmunjeom village and the Peace Museum that was originally built for and houses original copies of the 1953 armistice. From there it is a short drive to the JSA.

DMZ and JSA

  • Camp Bonifas, at the southern entrance to DMZ. This is the US/South Korean military base standing "In Front of Them All" should an attack come. Visitors to Panmunjeom will change buses and get briefed here before entering the DMZ.
  • Freedom House, JSA. South Korea's pompous propaganda palace facing the demarcation line. Visitors are usually taken to the Peace Pagoda next to it, which provides good views of the JSA and surrounding countryside. Accessible only from the Southern side.
  • Panmun-guk, JSA. North Korea's pompous propaganda palace facing the demarcation line. Accessible only from the Northern side.
  • T1 through T3, JSA. These are the conference rooms straddling the border: the neat lines of microphones and, outside, the low concrete bar mark the exact position of the line of demarcation. Both South and North Korean soldiers in intentionally intimidating poses stand guard in and around the rooms. You're free to walk around the conference room and can hop from South to North if you wish. Just don't try to leave by the other exit!
  • Bridge of No Return, JSA. After the Korean war, some prisoners of war were given the choice to cross over the bridge or to stay on the side of their captors, hence the name. On August 18, 1976, a US attempt to cut down a poplar tree obstructing visibility of the bridge led to a battle with North Korean forces that left Capt. Arthur Bonifas and Lt. Mark Barrett dead in what was later known as the Axe Murder Incident. The bridge is now closed and a new bridge to the north is used instead. Usually visited from the South only.
  • North Korea Peace Museum, 500m north of the JSA. The building where the armistice agreement was signed. The actual documents are kept here, guarded over by a tattered, faded UN flag and a miraculously well-preserved DPRK flag. The axe of Axe Murder Incident fame is also stored here. Accessible from the North only.
  • Taesong-dong, DMZ. South Korea's showpiece "Freedom Village" in the DMZ, containing a little over 200 farmers working under 24-hour military guard and a 100-meter flagpole. The only ways to become a member of the village is to be born into it or by marriage (women only). Entry into the village is not permitted, but you will pass by on your way to the JSA from the South side.
  • Kijong-dong, DMZ. On the North Korean side, this is a former village built up with fancy apartment blocks and a 160-meter flagpole entered in the Guinness Book of World Records as the world's tallest — but nobody lives there, hence its common name "Propaganda Village". Entry into the village is not permitted, but it is clearly visible from the JSA (although binoculars will come in handy).

Outside the DMZ

On the South Korean side, sites outside the DMZ can be visited more cheaply and with less hassle. An hourly train runs between Seoul and Imjingak for about ₩ 1300 each way. Bus tours passing the Second & Third Tunnel cost ₩ 8000. This is an excellent alternative for the DMZ tours, though it is not possible to visit Panmunjeom this way.

  • Imjingak, Paju. A four-story museum and observatory 7 km south of the DMZ, with views across the Kaesong River towards the DMZ and North Korea. The train line to Pyongyang passes nearby. This is the closest you can get to the DMZ without security clearance. The museum is open 9 AM to 6 PM daily.
  • Second & Third Tunnel. Two of four tunnels secretly dug by the North Koreans that have been discovered so far.

Sleep

There is no accommodation for the general public at Panmunjeom. Most visitors from the south day-trip from Seoul, while visitors from the north either do a long day-trip from Pyongyang or overnight in Kaesong.

Room and board at Camp Bonifas is restricted to active duty soldiers in the United States Armed Forces. However, retired servicemen who have received the Medal Of Honor might be able to stay on a "space available" basis. Contact the United Nations Command Security Battalion - Joint Security Area for enquiries.

Sleep

There is no accommodation for the general public at Panmunjeom. Most visitors from the south day-trip from Seoul, while visitors from the north either do a long day-trip from Pyongyang or overnight in Kaesong.

Room and board at Camp Bonifas is restricted to active duty soldiers in the United States Armed Forces. However, retired servicemen who have received the Medal Of Honor might be able to stay on a "space available" basis. Contact the United Nations Command Security Battalion - Joint Security Area for enquiries.

Go next

Since visiting Panmunjeom is part of a high security guided tour (regardless whether you visit from North or South), you will be escorted back to either Seoul (from the south) or continue your tour (from the north). There are no other options normally available.


Go next

Since visiting Panmunjeom is part of a high security guided tour (regardless whether you visit from North or South), you will be escorted back to either Seoul (from the south) or continue your tour (from the north). There are no other options normally available.


Curated Travel Blogs

Panmunjeom Travel Guide | Travyde

  • If you spend any time as a tourist in Seoul you will no doubt end up on a tour of the DMZ
  • Panmunjom Travel Center offer a different kind of tour experience and one that is sure to leave you with a better understanding of what the situation is like along the DMZ The main quality that set this tour apart from the many other tours out there is the fact that for part of the tour, you get to travel and interact with a North Korean defector
  • So rather than hearing people speculate about what goes on in North Korea, you will hear first-hand the hardships these people faced and their courage to defect
Panmunjeom Travel Guide | Travyde

  • The Demilitarised Zone(DMZ) is a 241km long strip that has separated North from South Korea since the end of active hostilities in the Korean War
  • We had originally booked this tour for the day before but at the last minute got an email that the UN needed the meeting area for peace talks more than tourism so our trip to Panmunjom was cancelled and we went on a reduced tour a day later
  • Everyone in North Korea volunteers to do 7-10 years of military service or faces severe disadvantages throughout life such as problems getting into university or advancing in their careers
Panmunjeom Travel Guide | Travyde

  • On a cold afternoon with a clear sky ahead and a beating down sun, Panny Yu and I stepped nonchalantly across the border from South Korea into North Korea
  • Or, as it should be officially from the Republic of Korea into the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea
  • South Koreans cannot do this tour of course
Panmunjeom Travel Guide | Travyde
Panmunjom, South Korea
Panmunjeom Travel Guide | Travyde

  • ’s often said that the Korean Demilitarized Zone, or DMZ, is the most dangerous place on Earth
  • As you gaze out upon the DMZ from Checkpoint 3 of Panmunjeom’s Joint Security Area, your attention is drawn not to the rare opportunity to peek into mysterious North Korea, the North Korean soldiers perched on the watchtower nearby, or your chances of survival in a sudden (and highly unlikely) re-opening of hostilities
  • No one can properly take in the entire DMZ area over the course of a single weekend, but if you’re in Seoul, the peace village of Panmunjeom, the touching Imjingak park and the beautif ul mountains and rivers of Cheorwon offer the traveler a real glimpse of the history and culture of this most uniquely Korean tourist destination

Curated Video Guides

360 Video - Panmunjom JSA North Korea
360 Video - Panmunjom JSA North Korea
Explore the North Korean side of the DMZ (Demilitarized Zone) in the world's first 360° VR video of the most tense border in the Korean Peninsular.

South Korea's defense minister visits N. Korean soldier defection site at JSA
South Korea's defense minister visits N. Korean soldier defection site at JSA
송영무, JSA 방문…"냉철한 상황판단과 조치 매우 적절" Seoul's Defense chief visited the site where a North Korean soldier crossed over to the South while being shot at...

S. Korean activist crosses Border in Panmunjom! - Ro Su Hui
S. Korean activist crosses Border in Panmunjom! - Ro Su Hui
범민련 남측본부 부의장이 판문점 분리선을 넘어갔다 Pyongyang, July 5 (KCNA) -- Ro Su Hui, vice-chairman of the South Headquarters of the Pan-national Alliance for Korea's...

NKorean delegation returns to North Korea from Seoul
NKorean delegation returns to North Korea from Seoul
(22 Jan 2018) A North Korean delegation returned to the North on Monday after their two-day visit ahead of next month's Pyeongchang Winter Olympics. The delegation inspected possible venues...

North Korea DMZ at Panmunjom
North Korea DMZ at Panmunjom
A brief visit to the DMZ from the North Korean side. We sold all our stuff to travel around the world for a year. You can see more at: http://www.changesinlongitude.com/

Low-ranking N. Korean soldier defects to S. Korea via DMZ, several gunshots heard at border
Low-ranking N. Korean soldier defects to S. Korea via DMZ, several gunshots heard at border
북한군 1명 중서부 전선 GP 전방 너머로 귀순 This morning, a North Korean soldier defected to South Korea via the inter-Korean land border... just five weeks after the dramatic...

Experience a DMZ Tour - The Walk and Talk #29
Experience a DMZ Tour - The Walk and Talk #29
Greetings and salutations my excellent friends. Today on the Walk and Talk, we're going to take a special trip. Usually I simply pick out a location, walk around, and share my thoughts in real...

New US commander to SKorea visits Panmunjom
New US commander to SKorea visits Panmunjom
SHOTLIST 1. Wide view of North Korean flag pole as seen across the Military Demarcation Line from South Korea 2. Mid of North Korean flag viewed from South Korea 3. United States Army...

Conan Stars In North Korea’s First Late Night Talk Show
Conan Stars In North Korea’s First Late Night Talk Show
Live from the DMZ, Conan welcomes Steven Yeun. Plus, a special appearance by Supreme Leader Kim Jong-un and a guard wearing sunglasses indoors. More CONAN @ http://teamcoco.com/video Team...

Rare look inside Korea's demilitarized zone
Rare look inside Korea's demilitarized zone
CNN's Will Ripley reports exclusively from inside Korea's demilitarized zone where tension remains high at all times.

South Korea's defense minister visits N. Korean soldier defection site at JSA
South Korea's defense minister visits N. Korean soldier defection site at JSA
송영무, JSA 방문…"냉철한 상황판단과 조치 매우 적절" South Korea's Defense Minister on Monday visited the Joint Security Area at Panmunjeom -- the site where a North Korean...

DMZ and JSA Panmunjom Tour from Seoul
DMZ and JSA Panmunjom Tour from Seoul
Experience the tension between South Korea and North Korea on a tour of the DMZ and JSA Panmunjom from Seoul. http://bit.ly/2l5jtyM While in Seoul, travel to the Korean Demilitarized Zone (DMZ)...

Body of North Korean soldier repatriated from South Korea
Body of North Korean soldier repatriated from South Korea
1. Wide pan of Panmunjom in Demilitarised Zone 2. North Korean soldiers walking down stairs 3. South Korean soldiers marching towards the Military Demarcation Line carrying a coffin holding...

SKorean activist No Su-hui arrested as he returns from unauthorised trip to the North
SKorean activist No Su-hui arrested as he returns from unauthorised trip to the North
(5 Jul 2012) SHOTLIST Panmunjom, North Korea 1. Various of South Korean activist No Su-hui, vice chairman of South Korea's Pan-Alliance for Korea's Reunification, approaching border at Panmunjom...

NORTH KOREA - DMZ and JSA (Panmunjeom) FULL TOUR
NORTH KOREA - DMZ and JSA (Panmunjeom) FULL TOUR
A video trip to North Korean territory and the border from South Korea. The trip consists of many different stops including Dorasan station and the 3rd Infiltration Camp. We also went to the...

Tour of the DMZ from the North Korea side
Tour of the DMZ from the North Korea side
Clips from a tour of Korea's Demilitarized zone (DMZ) from the North Korean (DPRK) side. The explanation of the UN and US actions in the Korean war are of course quite different from the version...

DMZ- A look at the JSA from both North Korea & South Korea
DMZ- A look at the JSA from both North Korea & South Korea
A look at the JSA in the DMZ from both sides of the border. 3 different trips, twice from South Korea, once from the North. from 2004-2010.

The Surreal and Very Real DMZ-Walking Into North Korea (With DMZ Facts/Figures)
The Surreal and Very Real DMZ-Walking Into North Korea (With DMZ Facts/Figures)
My tour of the DMZ was perhaps the most surreal and fascinating part of my month long Asia trip. I took a USO tour through Koridoor Tours to Panmunjom, home of the JSA (Joint Security Area)...

North Korea's Dangerous Border: Inside The DMZ [Pt.1] | Direct From With Dena Takruri - AJ+
North Korea's Dangerous Border: Inside The DMZ [Pt.1] | Direct From With Dena Takruri - AJ+
Did you know North Korea and China are still technically at war with South Korea and the U.S.? That's because the Korean War ended in 1953 with an armistice agreement, not a peace treaty. Today,...

North Korean soldier rescued by navy to be repatriated
North Korean soldier rescued by navy to be repatriated
(2 Dec 2009) SHOTLIST 1. Wide pan of South Korea and North Korea border in Panmunjom, South Korea 2. Mid shot of a North Korean soldier looking through telescope 3. North Korean soldiers...

South Korea wants answers after North Korea cancels inspection trip to check performance venues
South Korea wants answers after North Korea cancels inspection trip to check performance venues
현송월 오늘 방남 취소+조명균 장관 "북에 중지 사유 통보 요청" Meanwhile... South Korea is demanding answers from North Korea... after the regime pulled the plug last...

Korea DMZ Tour-Panmunjom Conference Row
Korea DMZ Tour-Panmunjom Conference Row
Description of Conference Row in the DMZ (Demilitarized Zone) at Panmunjom by a U.S. Army soldier. This tour was with the USO (United Services Organization) out of Seoul, South Korea.

North Korean and south koreans Soldiers In DMZ Panmunjom North Korea
North Korean and south koreans Soldiers In DMZ Panmunjom North Korea
Available in HD Copyrights of all videos on this stream belong to SPRL Lafforgue. They may be not reproduced in any format without prior permission. contact: eric.lafforgue@gmail.com.

South Korea: North, South Korea delegations arrive in Panmunjom for historic talks
South Korea: North, South Korea delegations arrive in Panmunjom for historic talks
Delegates from North and South Korea met in Panmunjom on Tuesday to discuss Pyongyang's possible involvement in the 2018 Pyeongchang Winter Olympics as well as further ways to improve ties....

Bodies of 2 soldiers found dead near DMZ returned to North
Bodies of 2 soldiers found dead near DMZ returned to North
(3 Nov 2010) SHOTLIST 1. North Korean soldiers (green uniform) and South Korean military police (blue uniform) at Joint Security Area (JSA) in Panmunjom 2. Wide of repatriation ceremony...

Places, Sights, and Attractions

View Map
North Korean Demilitarized Zone (한반도 비무장지대 (DMZ))
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DMZ terbentang sepanjang 250 km dengan lebar sekitar 4 km. Di tengahnya, terbentang Garis Demarkasi Militer (MDL). Anda akan menjumpai sejumlah tentara dari kedua negara bila datang ke sini.
Distance: 1.22 km

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